The Best Used Book Store In Las Vegas

Dead Poet Books closed last year, but as great as it was, it wasn’t the best spot in town to find cheap used books. It’s not the also-awesome Amber Unicorn, either, or any of the few other decent such stores.

It’s Savers, the thrift store. Yes, most thrift stores are full of junk and the used book section is a waste of time (I’m looking at you, Goodwill), but Savers gets the job done.

There’s a location near the school where I work, and I drop in sometimes to check in on the inventory. It rotates pretty quickly–a good sign. I could tell about plenty of great finds there, but here’s the most recent one:

Last week I went in with three things in mind: I’ve wanted to read Ken Follett’s The Pillars of the Earth for years, but it’s long enough that I would want to own a copy so I could take my time. Ditto for James Michener’s Alaska, which I started three years ago and really liked, but couldn’t finish before I had to take it back to the library. Also, I’ve wanted to read Edward Rutherford’s London ever since it came out when I was in college. I’ve been keeping an eye out for good used copies of each for a long time, and they were all on my mind when I stopped in there last week. I decided ahead of time to buy a copy if I should see one of them.

They had all three. Six bucks well spent!

Here’s another example: a couple of years ago, when the Dragon Tattoo trilogy was super popular, I went looking for them in paperback for a friend. Found all three of those there, too.

Yes, it’s also full of Dean Koontz and John Grisham stuff, but the variety and quality of books there has never disappointed me.

 

 

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Paperback Inflation?

Last week I was browsing in a thrift shop for used books. I spotted this old edition of Tess of the D’urbervilles, which is marked with a sticker for the low, low price of 75¢. Of course, that discount is actually a fifteen cent increase over the original cover price, which is clearly visible next to the sticker. Yes, folks, apparently this old book is worth more used than it was when it was new. That’s the economy for you.

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The Best Reason to Shop at Thrift Stores

Sure, there’s variety and value.  You already knew that.  But an even better reason to shop at thrift stores is this:

The quality is light years ahead of what you think it is.  In fact, many clothes at thrift stores is practically brand new.

Skeptical?  Then you’ve underestimated the depth of the American consumer’s vanity and laziness.  What do I mean?

You think people donate clothes when the clothes are so old, ragged, and nasty that they might as well be trash.  True, actually, but those items never make it onto the store racks.  They get tossed before you ever see them.  And there’s another major reason why people give clothes away.

People give clothes away because they were gifts that they didn’t want, or because they don’t fit, or because they just don’t like something about them now.  These clothes are in perfect condition–people just give them away rather than stand in the return line or lose weight or because they want to make room for more clothes in their bursting closets.

Many people’s poor material management creates the bounty that is the inventory at the nearest Goodwill, or Savers, or Deseret Industries!

[What’s that, you say?  You say we’re in a recession?  Sorry, I couldn’t hear you over the sound of the iPad in your hand, and your newest venti caramel macchiato in your other hand.]