Reviewed and Recommended: Maidentrip

One of the coolest stories of the 21st century so far is that of Laura Dekker, the Dutch young woman who, just a few years ago as a teenager, became the youngest person to sail around the world alone.

maiden1In a world where helicopter parents worry about micro aggressions, it’s inspiring to see someone so competent and ambitious that such adventure is even still possible.

The film is mostly assembled from her own video diary on the year-and-a-half journey, with her narration, sometimes in Dutch with subtitles, and sometimes in English. We see her working hard, making tough choices, and exploring the world. She gets scared, but goes on, anyway.

This is no stale propaganda for being super human, though. Laura drops a few f-bombs. In one scene where she has docked for a while, she grows irritated with a reporter and acts like a bit of a brat towards her. This is a real person living life.

The shots of the ocean are often majestic (the two pictures here are screenshots), and though nothing here strives for profound depth, the simple nature of the themes make this documentary something of a modern day Walden for teens.

maiden2The action gets going quite quickly, and bits of backstory about Laura’s youth and family are filled in as needed–another level at which many young viewers might relate.

It occurred to me while watching this that a Dutch teen sailing around the world offers far more real multicultural content to a typical American viewer than most of what passes for multiculturalism these days.

Check it out, and consider checking it out with your own children.

 

 

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The World at War

On this Memorial Day, I started watching the 1974 British epic documentary, The World at War (thanks to this Instapundit post). One major thing I learned from the first episode is that Germany prepared for its early invasions by creating narratives of persecution about its intended targets, setting itself up as a liberator, and thus creating an environment where an apathetic world could capitulate to Germany’s political agenda.

Wow, good thing nothing like that happens anymore.

Ode to Catch-22, from Stone Reader

My favorite scene from the 2002 documentary Stone Reader. The combination here of the elemental score, the slow and colorful visuals, and the simultaneously awakening and valedictory narration make this a truly beautiful bit of the filmmaking art.

I copied and posted this clip online because nobody has much from this great movie anywhere, and I want to spread awareness of it. I encourage anyone seeing this to appreciate this celebration of literacy and to purchase the complete documentary–it’s really a wonderful film.