The Book of Moses: Dramatized Audio with Illustrations

This is a complete dramatized reading of the Book of Moses, from the Pearl of Great Price, with various pictures and study aids. The Book of Moses really is a little masterpiece, hidden in plain sight. It’s wise, beautiful, and leads directly to Jesus Christ–a scripture classic!

Another Way To Look At The Sacrament

I’ve always thought of the bread and water of the sacrament–the body and blood of Jesus–as emblems of his death only. That makes sense–the ordinance is to commemorate the Atonement.

But lately I’ve also been focusing on how it could direct us to his life, as well as his death.

The prayer on the water says, “the blood of thy Son, which was shed for them” (D&C 20:79), that second part explicitly directing us to think of Lord’s infinitely painful sacrifice that last night and day of his life.

The prayer on the bread, however, only mentions “the body of thy Son,” with no added description like there is on the water.

Indeed, the first two of the three Biblical synoptic gospels (John does’t mention the Last Supper), inspires this: both mention the body of Christ, without any further explanation, but then also mention the blood of Christ, with the overt follow-up about it being shed as a sacrifice for us:

Matthew 26:26-28

26 ¶And as they were eating, Jesus took bread, and blessed it, and brake it, and gave it to the disciples, and said, Take, eat; this is my body.

27 And he took the cup, and gave thanks, and gave it to them, saying, Drink ye all of it;

28 For this is my blood of the new testament, which is shed for many for the remission of sins.

Continue reading

Favorite Quotes From Lorenzo Snow

teachings-of-presidents-lorenzo-snowBrethren and sisters, there are some things that you and I ought to think about. The time is come when it behooves every man and every woman to know for themselves in relation to the foundation on which they stand. We should all strive to get a little nearer to the Lord. It is necessary for us to advance a little and obtain a full knowledge of those things which we should more fully understand. It is the privilege of every Latter-day Saint.

This is the condition of all men, no matter how well they start out, who allow their thoughts and affections to run after the world and its ways, and it is a plain and indisputable proof that when this is the case with men they love the world more than they love the Lord and His work upon the earth. Having received the light of the everlasting Gospel, and partaken of the good things of the kingdom, and being of the seed of Israel and heirs to great and glorious promises, we should labor with fidelity and diligence to accomplish what God has designed to do through us; we should be men and women of faith and power as well as good works, and when we discover ourselves careless or indifferent in the least, it should be sufficient for us to know it in order to mend our ways and return to the path of duty.

Nothing can be more foolish than the idea of a man laying off his religion like a cloak or garment. There is no such thing as a man laying off his religion unless he lays off himself. Our religion should be incorporated within ourselves, a part of our being that cannot be laid off. If there can be such a thing as a man laying off his religion, the moment he does so he gets on to ground he knows nothing about, he gives himself over to the powers of darkness, he is not on his own ground, he has no business there. The idea of Elders in Israel swearing, lying and giving way to intoxication is far beneath them; they ought to be above such things. Let us put from us every evil and live by every word that proceeds from the mouth of God [see D&C 98:11]. Let us lay hold of every duty assigned to us with ambition and energy that we may have the spirit of our God, the light of truth and the revelations of Jesus Christ within us continually.


Continue reading

A Picture For A Great Book of Mormon Verse

14117824_10209866266511572_2409278205517880784_nI made this last week because it’s one of my favorite verses in the whole Book of Mormon, and there weren’t any really good pictures out there featuring it (though I had to condense it to make it readable in the space available).

I love the rhetorical power in 3 Nephi 27:14. I read it as an ironic contrast: the innocent Christ is “lifted up” by guilty mankind to torture, which enables that same guilty mankind to be “lifted up” by Christ’s loving Father to salvation.

A friend pointed out that it can also be read as a parallel as well as a contrast: “as” Christ was lifted up on the cross, “even so should men be” also, in that each of us must “deny himself, and take up his cross daily, and follow me” (Luke 9:23), or that “our old man is crucified with him, that the body of sin might be destroyed, that henceforth we should not serve sin.” (Romans 6:6).

Clearly, there’s some deep and beautiful wisdom in this one verse. It should be read and lived and appreciated more. I hope you like the picture.

What Is Section 132 Really About?

Not marriage. Not really. A question about marriage is the impetus for the revelation, and information about it is given at a few points, but that information is always incidental, and given to illustrate points about the revelation’s larger theme.

Consider that section 132 is the last revelation Joseph Smith received that’s included in the Doctrine and Covenants. What might be the most important message of that book overall for the Saints in this dispensation? It’s one that is indeed extremely important and relevant for us this very day.



In 66 verses, the word “marriage” is only used two times. Other marriage-related terms occur not much more often: “marry” and “sealed” occur six times each, “concubines” and “wives,” four times each. The most commonly used marriage-related terms are “wife” and “adultery,” which occur ten times each; and “adultery” is always mentioned in material that’s meant to ensure that that sin is not committed.

Contrast that with the frequency of these other significant terms:

  • Commanded, commandment, priesthood – 7 times each
  • According, appointed, received—9 times each
  • Exaltation, receive—11 times each
  • Abide—12 times
  • Power, word—13 times each
  • Covenant—15 times
  • Servant—16 times

And perhaps the most important term of all, as suggested by frequency of use:

  • Law—32 times



A word cloud of terms in Doctrine and Covenants section 132

Continue reading

Weekly Family History Hacks

I just started a Facebook group called Weekly Family History Hacks. I’ll share resources and tips for people at all levels of research there. It’s open to the public and participation is encouraged, so please join and share!

The first post covers signing up for Family Search, using the Social Security Death Index, and getting the new Family Search Memories smartphone app.

Huston. Front- Asa Huston, John Henry Huston, Ellen Huston. Back- George A. Huston, Mildred M. Huston, Fred C. Huston, Cassia Huston Reams, John W. Huston.

My grandfather is the middle-aged man on the left. My great-grandfather is the old man in the front. 


A Song and Three Videos

I heard this contemporary cover of “Nearer My God To Thee” on Mormon Channel radio last week and loved it.

Also, I found these three videos to be very helpful in picturing the detailed directions for making the tabernacle, priestly clothing, etc. in Exodus 25-30. The narration isn’t from the King James Version, but it’s easy to tell what’s what. In fact, the updated terminology also helps clarify the KJV text.

The first video covers Exodus 25 (0:00-5:27), Exodus 26:15-30 (5:27-7:07), and Exodus 27:1-8 (7:07-8:09)

The second video covers Exodus 27:9-21 (0:00-2:30), and Exodus 28:1-43 (2:30-9:08)

The third video covers Exodus 30:1-10 (0:00-1:56), and 30:17-33 (1:57-4:30)

A Generation of Artisans and Scholars

Here’s a link to a little manifesto of mine just published by the good folks over at the excellent Junior Ganymede blog. In short, I argue that Latter-day Saints in the U.S. need to stop our tendency to go into white-collar careers and, instead, focus on professions in the humanities, because we need that to build a strong subculture, in order to stop the current mainstream culture from destroying our families.

Men and Porn

A friend of mine who works in the IT industry told me about this experience he had about a decade ago.

A guy in the cubicle next to his asked him to come over and look at his screen. My friend did and saw that his coworker had a pornographic image on display. He quickly turned away and said something like, “Thanks but no thanks.”

The coworker teased and scolded him a bit about being a prude and said, “C’mon, don’t pretend you don’t like it.”

And this is where the story gets memorable for me. My friend said, “I’m not pretending I don’t like it. I’m sure I would like it. That’s why I have to force myself to avoid it.”

I think that’s a great lesson for all of us.

“I know what you Christians believe.”

A response to accusations against Christians about being judgmental. Perhaps those making the accusations don’t understand just how universally we view the fallen state of humanity, and our need to all come to Christ with “a broken heart and a contrite spirit,” including me, and you, and all of us.

A Timeline for the Book of Ether

Ether timelineAs I continue to work on a single timeline integrating all the scriptures of the LDS Church, I’m still worried about how to split up Ether and match it with the Old Testament. In my draft from last year, I have the Jaredite character Lib congruent with King David, and the end of the Jaredite record running well into the Nephite timeline.

Today, I started over on that. My basis for this revision is to start with the very popular and well-supported theory that the Jaredite city of Lib (and the king its named for) is actually the historical Olmec city of San Lorenzo. San Lorenzo flourished from about 1400-1200 BC.

Also, the Book of Omni is actually unclear about how long the Mulekites were established in the Western hemisphere before they met Coriantumr.

For the sake of convenience, I’m dating the meeting of Coriantumr at about 550 BC, and, based on the San Lorenzo theory (and also for convenience), dating Lib at abut 1350.

(There will be lots of estimating and rounding here, since none of this can be precise, and since the splitting and mixing of Ether into the Old Testament will have to still consider creating a coherent narrative. Take all of this with a grain of salt–this is much more speculation than science, after all.)

Continue reading

Beautiful Bible Audio

A few weeks ago I had to drive out of state alone, and found this dramatized reading of the Book of Psalms on YouTube. I like the voice, as well as the peaceful, yoga/spa music in the background. I listened to most of this on the drive, and it was very pleasant. I should do this more often.

There are some audio files of the Book of Mormon on YouTube–the only really decent voice is on the church’s own version, and none of them have music. Alas, who will meet this need?

How Rare a Possession: The Book of Mormon

Watched this oldie with the fam a little while back. I’ve always loved how it celebrates the Book of Mormon: how amazing its very nature is and how powerfully it touches lives. As a film, the intro is perfect, the 1st half of the main film is done a bit too earnestly, and the 2nd half is nearly perfect (while some of the cut-away scenes from the Book of Mormon are great, others haven’t aged well). Still, this is a treasure. I wish we had more films like it, and I wish more people would watch it. (Seriously, why does this only have 18,000 views? It should be 18 million!)