The Perennial Protest

When I heard yet another guest expert on the radio yesterday say that the Occupy movement was a reaction to “the one percent” having gone too far and now needing correction, I wondered:

When in history have trendy young progressives ever NOT demanded that the wealthy fork over more of their earnings so the Robin Hoods could run things their way?  I mean, this is hardly a new development, is it?  Some sympathetic liberals might try to opine that the distribution of wealth is more disproportionate right now that at some other recent times, but even if so, that’s beside my point.  My point is that the self-righteous preening of the Occupiers–that they have been pushed too far by a despotic oligarchy–seems undermined by the fact that their ilk have always, everywhere, seemed to say the same thing. 

If anyone could offer a historical example to the contrary–a group of like-minded would-be protestors saying that the economic situation in their time and place was all hunky dory–I’d be intrigued to see it.

Advertisements

3 comments on “The Perennial Protest

  1. It can be a matter of a few dollars, and the cold realism of not having enough money to buy groceries sinks in.

    Only those people become protesters, who feel there’s something wrong, right? So, we might ask what they’re really saying and see if they have anything else than the old fact-of-the-matter gripe that the rich own more than their fare share. The latter is true, but we can do very little unless we want to.

    I’m not saying that the Occupiers are necessarily right. But saying that poverty has always existed, and there’s always been people that were unhappy about it, starting from Jehovah, (Wait. For the purpose of the argument he’s “people” regardless of our theological nuances.) is beside their point. The centralisation of wealth in fewer hands is a fact for the last 30-odd years, both worldwide and nationally diverse nations.

  2. “When in history have trendy young progressives ever NOT demanded that the wealthy fork over more of their earnings so the Robin Hoods could run things their way?”
    — Well, Robin Hood took the money of the wealthy by force, he didn’t bother with demonstrations. Be glad for that difference. When “trendy young progressives” decide they want to “run things their way,” you get events such as the French and Russian Revolutions. The wealthy didn’t fare too well in either of those cases. Both are examples of what happens when the top one percent forget they are outnumbered 99 to 1.

    “Some sympathetic liberals might try to opine that the distribution of wealth is more disproportionate right now that at some other recent times, but even if so, that’s beside my point.”
    — No, that pretty much IS the point. The bulk of this post shows you don’t really have one of your own.

    “If anyone could offer a historical example to the contrary–a group of like-minded would-be protestors saying that the economic situation in their time and place was all hunky dory–I’d be intrigued to see it.”
    — A stupid, illogical statement on its face. Why would people protest if they thought everything was “hunky-dory”?

    “My point is that the self-righteous preening of the Occupiers–that they have been pushed too far by a despotic oligarchy–seems undermined by the fact that their ilk have always, everywhere, seemed to say the same thing.”
    — “Always”? “Everywhere”? Ok, so where were these protesters last year? Where were they in 2009?

    Conclusion: You’re a nitwit.

    • I’m supposed to be grateful that angry young crowds have not resorted to force yet? That’s the big virtue of OWS? Your rationale here is little more than “might makes right.”

      By saying that I have no point, you’re proving it–progressive young crowds have always expressed malcontent with capitalism. Permanent reactionism is hardly a point in their favor.

      “Where were these protesters last year? Where were they in 2009?” They were in Greece, France, and England. Read the news.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s