About these ads
Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Mark Steyn, as always, is way ahead of the curve here.  By the time most of my fellow conservatives figure this out, I fear, we’ll be even more of a consciously inconsequential minority, a marginal annoyance with little functional power, than we already are.

*****

Where the Action Is,” National Review, 3/10/14

You can’t have conservative government in a liberal culture, and that’s the position the Republican party is in….Liberals expend tremendous effort changing the culture. Conservatives expend tremendous effort changing elected officials every other November — and then are surprised that it doesn’t make much difference. Culture trumps politics — which is why, once the question’s been settled culturally, conservatives are reduced to playing catch-up, twisting themselves into pretzels….

Culture is the long view; politics is the here and now. Yet in America vast cultural changes occur in nothing flat, while, under our sclerotic political institutions, men elected to two-year terms of office announce ambitious plans to balance the budget a decade after their terms end. Here, again, liberals show a greater understanding of where the action is….

So, no, I’m not particularly focused on a Tuesday in November in 2016. Liberals understand that it’s in the 729 days between elections that you win all the prizes that matter, on all the ground conservatives have largely abandoned.

What Is the Future of Conservatism?Commentary, January 2013

The Democrats used their brutal Romney-gives-you-cancer/ Ryan-offs-your-granny advertising in Ohio as bad cop to the good cop of Obama’s cultural cool. The trouble for conservatives is we have no good cop. That’s to say, we have no positive presence in the broader cultural space where real people actually live. We have all the talk-radio shows and cable networks we need, and the rest of the country is happy to leave us walled up in those redoubts. But culture trumps politics, and not just in the movies and pop songs, grade schools and mainline churches, but increasingly in the boardrooms, too. Instead of giving your hard-earned dollars to help drag some finger-in-the-windy squish with an R after his name over the finish line every other November, conservatives need to start fighting on the turf that matters. We risk winding up like the Shakers–dependent on conversion while eschewing all effective means thereof.

 

About these ads

“The days are long, but the years are short.” –Gretchen Rubin.  One of the wisest things I’ve ever heard.

 

 

It’s always amazingly scary to think about how tiring, how busy and stressful most individual days are, but then to look back on the last year, or the last five years, or even the last ten years, and realize how much happened in them, and how much seems missed, and how it all went by so quickly.

I have children who are rapidly approaching adulthood, and I constantly wonder where their childhood went.  How did it disappear so suddenly?

I’ve now been teaching high school for more than three times as long as I went to high school, and the student part of my life actually feels like it lasted longer than this part.  Weird.

It’s true what they say, isn’t it?  At some point, every year seems to go by even faster than the year before.

I think if you’re not consciously being corny and sentimental, at least some of the time, you may not be doing it right.  There will likely be more regrets.

*sigh*  Don’t mind me.  I’m still just bummed out about How I Met Your Mother being over.

 

For all the hyperbolic praise lavished on it and all the interpretive controversy surrounding it, here’s what I took away from finally seeing Disney’s Frozen last week: it’s very good, and decently thought provoking, but it is neither one to the degree that everyone says it is.

The animation and music are excellent, though not unusually so–Frozen is great in those ways, but it is not a masterpiece. For example, the symbolism of Elsa’s power is muted in vagueness–the simplest explanation of Elsa’s power is that she’s merely an introvert.

And this is where the characterization in the film went off track.  (Warning: spoilers ahead; on the off-chance that you’re even more out-of-the-loop than I and still haven’t seen it, the following may not make much sense, anyway.)

The whole concept of the film is that Elsa is different.  Hardly revolutionary stuff in storytelling, but the plot makes it clear that Elsa doesn’t have anything against people, but her nature makes it hard to be around them.  Her sister, on the other hand, is a social butterfly.

Continue Reading »

  1. This One Weird Story Actually Makes Sense Out of Everything–Amazing!
  2. Such Drama in This Rich, Dysfunctional Family That Threw It All Away
  3. A Politician Who Really Cares About The People? What?!
  4. One Man Stands Alone Against a Whole Society–So Inspiring!
  5. 50 Questions That Will Rock Your World–#30 Took My Breath Away
  6. This Guy Has The Ultimate Secrets of Success in Work–Here They Are!
  7. 5 Simple Steps To Find Out That God Is Real! Wow! Really Works!
  8. This Normal Slacker Went From Zero to Hero–The Big Difference Is Right in the Middle!
  9. Read This True Story About Children and Angels and Try Not to Cry!
  10. One Awesome Challenge That Promises a Miracle! Changes You Forever!

Betrayal.  Revenge.  Conspiracy.  Murdering your way up the ladder of power.  People usually associate these plot elements with Shakespeare’s tragedies, but I see them operate most strongly in his histories.  That’s one reason why those tend to be my favorite of his works.

Besides just being The Sopranos on an Elizabethan stage, the language here is where Shakespeare gets the most deliciously vicious.

Consider some of the lesser history plays.  Even there, the dialogue tends to be enough to make one’s blood boil.

Henry VI, Part II takes us into the War of the Roses, which was also the historical basis for Game of Thrones, so you know this’ll be full of politically venomous mayhem:

And even now my burthen’d heart would break,
Should I not curse them. Poison be their drink!
Gall, worse than gall, the daintiest that they taste!
Their sweetest shade a grove of cypress trees!
Their chiefest prospect murdering basilisks!
Their softest touch as smart as lizards’ sting!
Their music frightful as the serpent’s hiss,
And boding screech-owls make the concert full!
All the foul terrors in dark-seated hell—  (III.2.320-328)

And this one has my favorite lines of all in Shakespeare’s early plays:

Upon thy eye-balls murderous tyranny
Sits in grim majesty, to fright the world.  (III.2.49-50)

Continue Reading »

How to be a droll troll: say “That’s what she said!” immediately after any female ever says anything.

Three examples from my experience as a teacher:

1. A young man struggles with his work at school because his divorced mother has a hard time getting him to school.  His father tries to facilitate contact with the teachers and get his work made up, but it’s just too overwhelming.  Despite the student loving his school and wanting to thrive there, he ends up having to switch schools in the middle of the year.

2. A young woman is very successful at school, until her mother starts hitting her in fights.  The student has to move in with her aunt and, like the young man above, switch schools in the middle of the year, losing a leadership position at the school she’d attended for years.

3. A young woman has difficulty focusing on maintaining her grades while her mother has to move their family frequently to avoid her father, a drug user who, since getting out of jail, is harassing them.

Cherry-picked worst-case scenarios from over the years to make a point?  I wish.  I saw all three of these things happen in just the last two months.

Family structure and stability are so crucial to success.  That’s common sense, and it’s also supported by mountains of research.  Still, we don’t talk about it anymore because it might be inconvenient for some adults, or hurt our feelings, or be politically incorrect.  And kids just keep paying the price for it…

 

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 562 other followers

%d bloggers like this: